Bought a 2006 and back timing chain rattles for 20 seconds then quits, Tensioner?

Discussion in '2005+ Ford Mustang v6 4.0L Tech' started by Ed Brown, Jun 19, 2021.

  1. Ed Brown

    Ed Brown Junior Member

    2
    0
    Was hoping rear tensioner could be changed to get by a while. Car has 10w 30 oil in it, might try 5w or like a 0w oil. Previous owner put in 10w since has over 200,000 miles.
     
  2. DieHarder

    DieHarder Member

    480
    211
    Changing out anything on the timing chains (especially rear) for a V6 is a wickedly tough job.

    There's a four-part YouTube series by Ford Tech Makuloco which is about 3 hours in total that does a good job explaining and showing everything involved. Given yours has over 200K why don't you go for a low mileage used, rebuild or swap?

     
    Dino Dino Bambino and Aerofinz like this.
  3. Ed Brown

    Ed Brown Junior Member

    2
    0
    I was thinking the hydraulic tensioner is wore out, once it get oiled its quit as can be, it not hard to get to rear back of head. Just bought, need to drive, but will look for a low mile engine and probably change the cartriges out on them while out.
     
  4. O_M3G_A

    O_M3G_A Junior Member

    9
    0
    For any engine with high miles I would stick with the recommended viscosity and with a bottle of STP High Mileage Oil Treatment, UNLESS you live in cold weather, then I would drop to 0w(0w-30). I own a 2011 Elantra with 287K miles, it developed the famous piston slap at 140K on 3 cylinder and its still running using the recommended oil viscosity and a bottle of STP , I live In Cali, and last year I took it to Texas..

    Increasing the oil viscosity can do more harm than good, your oil pressure will rise BUT oil delivery through out the engine will take a hit, especially to places further away from the oil pump. There is NO NEED to replace the engine just because of the mileage UNLESS there is something severe with it, a simple timing chain rattle caused by a worn tensioner or stretched chain is nothing to be concerned about, since they can be replaced and solve the issue. My 2010 has 163K miles, and aside from a transmission issue, the engine is healthy, I checked the rear rod bearings(furthest away from the oil pump) and they looked great, almost new, inspected the cylinders using an inspection camera, looks good very little carbon deposit and cylinder cross hatches are still visible on all 6... not to mention great compression too..

    In my opinion pull the engine out and replace both timing chain cassettes.. or a rebuild, new bearings, oil pump, rings, etc. if you're still worried.
     
  5. Juice

    Juice forum member

    2,769
    879
    IMO, it is decision time, repair or replace engine. The only sure thing at this time is the engine is coming out.
     
  6. Iceman62

    Iceman62 Bullitt 6005

    1,028
    236
    ^^^This^^^
    If that thing lets loose - you'll be doing 2nd option anyway.
     
  7. Gabe

    Gabe Whippled Coyote

    8,106
    1,112
    I had an '01 Ranger with the 4.0 SOHC in it, had the engine pulled and all the timing chains and cassettes replaced at about 60-70k miles, the start-up noise never went away, it got better but was still there even after all the work, which was done by a good engine tech at the Ford dealership I used to work at.
    The guy had the engine out and on a stand in less than an hour, lol.
    Honestly, at 200k, I would drive it as is while looking for a late-model engine replacement with low miles.
     
  8. tjm73

    tjm73 of Omicron Persei 8 S197 Team Member

    11,870
    1,539
    This is a common issue with the 4.0 SOHC engines. The fix is well documented online.
     
  9. Juice

    Juice forum member

    2,769
    879
    :lol:1 hr to pull engine=experience.
     
    Bullitt2954 likes this.
  10. tjm73

    tjm73 of Omicron Persei 8 S197 Team Member

    11,870
    1,539
    Truth.

    In the mid-late 90's there was a young guy that worked for my Dad in his dealership for a number of years that would drive an Econoline van into his work space at 8am, pull the bad engine, install the replacement engine and back it out 100% done before 5 pm at the end of his work day. He did it several times. And he took two breaks and an hour lunch. Now if you ever worked on, or even thought about working on, an Econoline van you know this is no small feat.
     
    Bullitt2954 likes this.
  11. Juice

    Juice forum member

    2,769
    879
    Biggest thing with vans is pulling off the front end/grille! Been there done that, was a dealer tech for 15 years.
     
  12. Aerofinz

    Aerofinz Member

    179
    70
    [QUOTE="Gabe": Honestly, at 200k, I would drive it as is while looking for a late-model engine replacement with low miles.[/QUOTE]

    Best answer. They are relatively cheap.
     
  13. Juice

    Juice forum member

    2,769
    879
    Best answer. They are relatively cheap.[/QUOTE]
    I got $500 for my v6 with 100k on the clock, that was 4 years ago. Guy told me he had a difficult time finding a good used 4.0.
     
  14. Gabe

    Gabe Whippled Coyote

    8,106
    1,112
    What's your point?
     
  15. Aerofinz

    Aerofinz Member

    179
    70
    To me that is an example of "relatively cheap" (what do you buy for $500 anymore?). It looks like your right, 2-3 times that currently on Ebay. More reason to just drive it!
     
    Bullitt2954 likes this.
  16. Bullitt2954

    Bullitt2954 Member

    209
    122
    ‘70s/‘80s Dodge Tradesman vans. I don’t know why, but my Dad loved those POS’s.
     
  17. tjm73

    tjm73 of Omicron Persei 8 S197 Team Member

    11,870
    1,539
    If I were to guess, they were tough as nails and could swallow a lot of stuff.
     
  18. Bullitt2954

    Bullitt2954 Member

    209
    122
    We did a v8-swap on a s6/manual once. It blew ass trying to find and fit small, fiddly-ass parts like linkages and mounts, harnesses and the like.

    This was back in the days when NOBODY made any kind of “kits”, for ANYTHING.
     
  19. nfrizell

    nfrizell Member

    161
    90
    These leak down when sitting because the gaskets blow out.[​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
     
  20. Dino Dino Bambino

    Dino Dino Bambino I have a red car

    Age:
    58
    2,847
    896
    It's becoming increasingly difficult to find low mileage 4.0 V6 engines since their production ended 11 years ago so I suggest you remove your existing engine and refresh it with new timing chains/guides/tensioners, new rod/main bearings, new piston rings, new oil pump, and new gaskets/seals. If there's a ridge at the top of each cylinder, you'll need to have them rehoned. Do it once, do it right, and you'll have an engine that'll last at least another 100k miles. You could also use the opportunity while the engine's out to bolt on a pair of headers and underdrive pulleys to add some performance.
    If you're planning to keep the car for at least five years, it might be worth the expense. Otherwise just do the minimum necessary to solve the immediate problem (new rear timing chain, tensioners, and chain guides) and leave it at that. You could then start saving pennies for a future Coyote swap if you change your mind.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.