Control Arms

ognalysis

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I've gotten the arms, and managed to get one in so far.

Still confused about how to torque. Some say torque under load, some say you only need to do that for the rear.

Even if I load it, I'm not sure how to.
 

Miker

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I've gotten the arms, and managed to get one in so far.

Still confused about how to torque. Some say torque under load, some say you only need to do that for the rear.

Even if I load it, I'm not sure how to.
I went to a lot of trouble to measure where the arm sat why the car was sitting level before I pulled the wheels off. In the end it wanted to be in that same position when the rear 2 bolts were torqued. If you think about how its made you can see that the back bushing is always going to be on center unless the arm is loaded or un loaded. The weight of the arm by itself is not enough to pull the bushing off center. So tighten the back 2 first then the front. Once you put the stut and other parts on it will be extended but with the car on its wheels it will return to that point or very close.
 

ognalysis

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I went to a lot of trouble to measure where the arm sat why the car was sitting level before I pulled the wheels off. In the end it wanted to be in that same position when the rear 2 bolts were torqued. If you think about how its made you can see that the back bushing is always going to be on center unless the arm is loaded or un loaded. The weight of the arm by itself is not enough to pull the bushing off center. So tighten the back 2 first then the front. Once you put the stut and other parts on it will be extended but with the car on its wheels it will return to that point or very close.
That's what most guides I've seen instruct.

I think most of my confusion comes from all the guides saying the bushing needs to be loaded before torquing, but they fail to mention that seems to only apply to the *rear* control arms.

Ultimately, I'll be getting an alignment early next week, so hopefully that will handle any misalignment I may cause.
 

lwarrior1016

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That's what most guides I've seen instruct.

I think most of my confusion comes from all the guides saying the bushing needs to be loaded before torquing, but they fail to mention that seems to only apply to the *rear* control arms.

Ultimately, I'll be getting an alignment early next week, so hopefully that will handle any misalignment I may cause.
I just did my arms last week. I torqued the rear bolts, and left the front bolts loose. Then assembled everything and put the front end on ramps. Then torqued the front bolt.
 

Miker

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That's what most guides I've seen instruct.

I think most of my confusion comes from all the guides saying the bushing needs to be loaded before torquing, but they fail to mention that seems to only apply to the *rear* control arms.

Ultimately, I'll be getting an alignment early next week, so hopefully that will handle any misalignment I may cause.
It wouldn't change an alignment spec. What you are trying to achieve is having the bushing be in a neutral position when the car is sitting on its tires. Once torqued down the bushings are in whatever position they were in when torqued. So if they are twisted one way or the other they are going to have to twist more than designed when the suspension compresses or rebounds.
 

v2rocket

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Having had both side by side, the new style is much beefier...and heavier.
Hi, I am wondering if you or anyone else have actually weighed the 05-09 vs 10-14 control arms to see how much lighter the early style is?

I am retrofitting S197 spindles/brakes onto an old Porsche and have a 10+ spindle/arm on hand. The 2010+ arm without the hydrobushing is about 10lbs. The stock Porsche arm is just under 6.

I know it's only 4 lbs but the engineer in me wants to cut unsprung weight if possible.
It would be a lot easier to just use an earlier arm if it's light enough, rather than making my own frankenstein arms to get it all in the car.

This car is 600lbs lighter than the lightest factory S197 (and over 1000lbs less than a GT500), so I am not too concerned about control arm beef.
 

Samos3

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Sorry, I don't have that info. I did read somewhere that a few people had twisted the earlier arm in spirited driving.
If you go with the 05-10 arm, you'll need the 05-10 spindle (or maybe balljoint, not sure if the later ballpoint will fit into the early arm).
 

ognalysis

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It wouldn't change an alignment spec. What you are trying to achieve is having the bushing be in a neutral position when the car is sitting on its tires. Once torqued down the bushings are in whatever position they were in when torqued. So if they are twisted one way or the other they are going to have to twist more than designed when the suspension compresses or rebounds.
That all makes sense, but I don't see how to torque that with everything assembled.
 

v2rocket

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Sorry, I don't have that info. I did read somewhere that a few people had twisted the earlier arm in spirited driving.
If you go with the 05-10 arm, you'll need the 05-10 spindle (or maybe balljoint, not sure if the later ballpoint will fit into the early arm).
No, the late ball joint won't work in an early arm. Not only is the stud shaft larger (19 vs 18mm) but the OD of the ball joint housing itself is larger on the late ones.
 

ognalysis

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That all makes sense, but I don't see how to torque that with everything assembled.
Well, I think I've got it figured out, now.

Lowing it onto my ramps, slide down the tie rod bellows, and turn the wheel (not necessarily in this order), should give me the clearance to torque that bolt while loaded.

Wish me luck, gang
 

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