Plastic Bumper Paint Removal

Discussion in 'Keeping it Clean' started by MADGT, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. MADGT

    MADGT forum member

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    Team,

    I need to strip off the paint off a plastic bumper--what have you used that works well on plastic?
     
  2. Slick4.6

    Slick4.6 forum member

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    Aircraft paint stripper works very well, I can’t remeber though if there is one specifically for plastic or if it’s safe to use on plastic. Either way it literally melts the paint off.
     
  3. mrt2you

    mrt2you forum member

    Age:
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    i am a bodyman for over 30 years.
    SEM makes a plastic bumper stripper, https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...ripper/77713&usg=AOvVaw3Hmzd49a_3pIo1J5QAnb-k.
    DO NOT USE stripper designed for metal. it can destroy the plastic.
    you could try stripper designed for fiberglass. i have never tried it so i can't tell you if it will or won't work.

    this stripper removes aftermarket paint, paint applied at a body shop. it will NOT remove a OEM finish. the best way to remove OEM paint is with sandpaper.
     
  4. MADGT

    MADGT forum member

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    Thanks folks - i have sanded the bumper down instead of stripping down the paint. Hope to paint it next week.
     
  5. MADGT

    MADGT forum member

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    So, like I stated above, I sanded down my Roush Front fascia down to the plastic. Why? Because after 12 years of driving,the front bumper was in bad, bad shape. Anyway, all paint, primer, clear coat and if it had adhesion promoter is now gone. The surface is rough as I used 320 grit to get rid of all -- but have a question...should I be applying adhesion promoter before the primer? Or can I apply primer to the bare, but sanded down plastic? Thoughts?
     
  6. mrt2you

    mrt2you forum member

    Age:
    55
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    it depend on what type of plastic it's made of.
    polypropylene based plastics need a adhesion promoter.
    abs type of plastics don't.
    it's important to determine plastic type. if you use adhesion promoter on plastics that don't need promoter it can cause adhesion problems.

    a simple test to determine plastic type is to cut a small sliver of the plastic off. then drop it in water. if the plastic floats use adhesion promoter. if it sinks you don't need promoter.
    make sure that there are no air pockets under the plastic. force the sliver to the bottom of the water several times. if it still floats it's definitely polypropylene plastic.


    also primers need a tooth to help adhesion. 320 is to fine of a grit. i myself use 180 for areas that need primer. on the non bare areas 320 grit will be ok.
     
  7. MADGT

    MADGT forum member

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    Interesting. According to the Roush Website -- the fascia is a High-strength TPO (thermal plastic olefin). According to a data sheet I found, TPO materials usually require surface treatment prior to painting. I will use the back of the bumper as my test area. thanks for the info.