Spark Plug Replacement

Discussion in '2005+ Mustang GT 4.6L Tech' started by Joe2006, Feb 3, 2020.

  1. Joe2006

    Joe2006 Junior Member

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    Hi. I am going to change the spark plugs on my 2006 GT. After looking at lots of different ideas on the internet, I would like some current information. Some say leave the engine cold, others say warm it up. Some say put in Ford plugs, others Champion, etc. Should you soak the plugs after you break them loose, or is that not necessary? Also, if the car runs fine, is there any benefit to replacing the coils? Thanks.
     
  2. 06 T-RED S/C GT

    06 T-RED S/C GT forum member

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    Please search the sub-forums, as this topic has been discussed time and time again. You'll find plenty of threads that provide all the answers your searching for.
     
  3. Windstang

    Windstang Junior Member

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    +1. Lots of factors affecting whether or not some of your plugs will break. I followed the TSB and went slow. I didn't use an impact. I used PB Blaster overnight and cracked the plugs just a hair in the morning - obviously a cold engine. Waited a few hours, then worked them back and forth. Lots of screeching. None broke. When the plugs were out, I cranked the engine over to blow out any liquid from the engine. Put towels over the holes to keep stuff from blowing all over the engine. I didn't replace the coils. I put 1 piece Champions back in. No problems with them. Good luck.
     
  4. stkjock

    stkjock ---- Madmin ---- Staff Member Administrator Super Moderator S197 Team Member

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  5. Laga

    Laga Member

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    This is how I did my 05 about 4 years ago. Sprayed enough in each hole so the PB was a 1/4” deep. I vacuumed out the plug hole and then blew out with compressed air. No problem.
     
  6. 07 Boss

    07 Boss Senior Member

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    After you get through this I would like to make one suggestion. Pull your plugs occasionally to check and clean them. I do this at least once a year if I'm not racing and quite a bit more when I'm making track passes. First off you can get an idea of how your car is running when you check them. Kinda old school but it's habit. The second great benefit that even if you're using a 2-piece plug you won't have any issues with excessive carbon build up around the barrel of the plug. I've swapped plugs dozens of times without any plug sticking issues because I follow this simple procedure. Part of my regular PM program.
     
  7. Joe2006

    Joe2006 Junior Member

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    Thank you! Is Champion the preferred plug?
     
  8. 07 Boss

    07 Boss Senior Member

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    I wouldn't run champions in my lawn mower. Go with Brisk or Accel if you want to get away from the HT1's or HT0's.
     
  9. Windstang

    Windstang Junior Member

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    I put in the Champions when I did mine 4 or 5 years ago and no issues at all, but mine is stock and no engine mods. Some people like the Champions as I do, others not so much. I think it is more personal preference. Some people have gap issues - mine were fine out of the box. The important thing IMO is to use a 1 piece plug to avoid future problems with the plugs breaking - or if you choose to stay with a 2 piece design, take them out regularly and put the Antisieze on the snout..
     
  10. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    I still say the PB blaster technique is a placebo.

    The problem with the plugs is that soot builds up on the bottom, shaft portion of the plug - BELOW THE THREADS. That soot then bonds with, or seizes to, the head and causes the plug to be stuck . . . and break if torqued hard enough. This is why the TSB has the installer put nickel anti-seize on the aforementioned shaft area and not the threads.

    The problem is not at the threads. Any PB blaster or similar will never get down past the threads enough to hit the area of concern.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2020
  11. 06 T-RED S/C GT

    06 T-RED S/C GT forum member

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    The TSB also recommends using Motorcraft carburetor cleaner prior to extracting the spark plugs, as the chemicals in the carb cleaner supposedly help dissolve the carbon build-up around the ground shield shaft just below the threads. Through my personal experience, it does work it's way down past the threads, but it does take time. Therefore I would recommend leaving in the carb cleaner for at least a couple of hours to make sure it's worked it's way all the way down and time enough to dissolve the carbon build-up before extracting the spark plugs just to be on the safe side.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2020
  12. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    Fair enough. The idea that any fluid makes it all the way past every thread, and then dissolves the crap on the shaft kind of violates common sense, IMO.
     
    06 T-RED S/C GT likes this.
  13. 06 T-RED S/C GT

    06 T-RED S/C GT forum member

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    Just saying what Ford recommends in the TSB. It may not make much common sense, but never the less, I followed Ford's recommended procedure and it turned out to be successful :shrug:
     
    1950StangJump$ likes this.
  14. Windstang

    Windstang Junior Member

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    As I said - I followed the TSB also. So OP - how did the plug change go. It's always interesting to hear how people did when changing them.
     
  15. Rick Simons

    Rick Simons Member

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    Removing the plugs when warm makes sense. Pity I didn't see that before I did mine. I don't plug (no pun intended) too many products, but PB Blaster has saved my sanity more times than I can recall. I went 7 for 8 on my plugs, but the last one (the one that broke) probably wouldn't have if I hadn't rushed it a little. A lot of liquids will wick through very small clearances due to surface tension. The bottom part of my plugs were wet with a combination of the PB and dissolved carbon when I got them out, so I would have to say soaking them worked.
     
  16. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    Well, maybe I stand corrected on whether the PB will make it to the bottom part of the plugs where they fuse to the head.

    Or it's just seeping down there AFTER you break the plug free and as you begin unscrewing it. Who knows.
     
  17. 06 T-RED S/C GT

    06 T-RED S/C GT forum member

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    It seeps down after breaking the plug free between 1/8-1/4 turn. Then you let the plugs soak before proceeding with the extraction.
     
  18. MrBhp

    MrBhp Member

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    I quit doing all of the above a few years ago. I haven't broke one since, and up until March of last year I was doing 4 or 5 a month. I now use my 3/8 air impact, just slightly rocking in and out at first. Increasing the out stroke more than the in stroke each time, until I achieve full fallout.
     
  19. 06 T-RED S/C GT

    06 T-RED S/C GT forum member

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    Consider yourself as fortunate that none have broken. Personally, I wouldn't have enough confidence with using an air impact, as there would always be that fear in my head of either stripping the threads or the plug separating from the torque of the air impact :shrug:
     
  20. MrBhp

    MrBhp Member

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    If I were using my 1/2 drive impact I would probably pinch up my undies pretty well, but the little impact I use just doesn't have the nuts to break a whole lot. I have broken my share of them by hand, however.
     
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