The Great Intercooler Water Pump Test

Discussion in 'Mustang Chit Chat' started by Department Of Boost, Oct 22, 2014.

  1. Department Of Boost

    Department Of Boost Alpha Geek

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    You could make arguments both directions. I'd run the bypass. There is no way of telling if you're having cavitation issues unless you put some clear tubing in after the pump so you can see it.
     
  2. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    Understood, thanks. Okay, sorry to hijack. Back on subject . . .
     
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  3. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    Hey, I was putting thought into this, and I can see now how the bypass can't hurt flow even if not needed.

    But correct me if I'm wrong, but the downside with the bypass will be that you can't tell positively if the pump is working, right? With a bypass in place, the tank becomes a true overflow and de-gas, so it will look like the engine coolant overflow . . . no visible movement in it per sae. Instead, the level will just climb and lower with heat just like the engine coolant (but not as much since it doesn't get as hot as engine coolant).

    So, if the pump jams up with air, you wouldn't know until it your intake temp gauge climbed. With no bypass, there would be obvious flow in the tank, and you would know if that stopped that there's a problem. Am I right?
     
  4. Department Of Boost

    Department Of Boost Alpha Geek

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    The water still flows through the tank. Just slower/less volume.
     
  5. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    10-4, thanks
     
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  6. eighty6gt

    eighty6gt forum member

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    Here's the bypass I built, I suspect it's pretty cheap. Those are coolant-rated tees and I used heat shrink hose clamps. There's a restrictor on the path that goes up to the degas (the fox body heater core part!)

    With the way I have the lines run the degas has a direct run into the pump inlet. Before I had a loop which made priming annoying, so I like this system for flow, priming, etc... Nice gentle waves in the degas bottle, and I went to a standard GT500 unit instead of the VMP enormous one I had before. The 2013 HE has plenty of extra room for coolant volume. The system functions spectacularly.

    IMG_20180903_151930.jpg
     
  7. Pentalab

    Pentalab forum member

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    The oem 13/14 GT-500 de-gas is a tiny little thing. The de-gas on the 2010 roush M90 is huge by comparison. From output of IC, it goes to top of de-gas. Bottom of de-gas goes to input of pump. Output of pump goes to bottom right corner of Roush 18" tall x 21" wide HE. Top left of HE goes back to input of IC...completing the loop. I can just notice the coolant moving in the de-gas..but that's with oem Bosch pump. I estimate there is perhaps 2 gals in the loop. At 4 gpm, it would take a full 30 secs to circulate the coolant..once.
    With just 5.8 psi, and 70-85 deg F outside ambient temps, it's a non issue with 94 octane.
     
  8. 1950StangJump$

    1950StangJump$ forum member

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    Seems like, for efficiency of flow/cooling, you'd want the line from the IC to the pump to be the most direct, with the degas being off to the side. In other words, no right had turns from the IC to the pump, but instead have 90 degree turns in the 'T' connections be for the degas supply and return lines . . . like the picture DOB posted.

    As for priming, I think it would be important to have the main line continue downward from the IC to the pump, with the supply line 'T' to the degas being slightly higher than the 'T' return from the degas. Again, like DOB pictured.

    This would encourage all air to float upward to the degas where it would be carried away harmlessly. It would still take longer to purge air than with no bypass, but I think still okay.
     
  9. eighty6gt

    eighty6gt forum member

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    yes.
     
  10. DiMora

    DiMora More Is Better

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    There are actually four ways to plumb, depending on whether you run an ice-box or not.

    Street car (no ice)...you want the pump to push water into the heat exchanger (ALWAYS fill the heat exchanger from the bottom)

    One way for street car:

    Pump outlet->heat exchanger bottom inlet ->intercooler->degas fill inlet ->pump inlet

    A variation is:

    Degas outlet -> pump ->intercooler->heat exchanger->degas inlet

    The only difference between the above two is whether or not the pump goes between the degas and the heat exchanger (first one) or the degas and the intercooler (second one).

    For a pure race car or a street car where you run ice on race days, you can plumb either permantly or temporarily to go:

    Ice box exit-> Pump inlet -> intercooler ->heat exchanger bottom inlet->ice box inlet

    That routing works well when you have room to mount the coolant pump right on the firewall between a battery box ice tank and the intercooler inlet

    Variation:

    Ice box exit ->intercooler ->pump->heat exchanger bottom inlet->ice box inlet

    That routing works well when you mount the pump near the heat exchanger...usually below the windshield washer tank like Saleen does or above the left front wheel wheel inside the splash guard like Roush does. Shelby's often mount the pump along the top of the heat exchanger.

    The reason for the above two flow paths is to get the ice water going straight to the intercooler without warming in the heat exchanger
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019 at 12:34 PM